About Nana Lou

Matriarch of the Burgeron family. Soon to turn 100.

Icelandic Imagery

The Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival is underway. Our weekly Around The World workshops are a place to learn more about a culture and to build your creative digital muscles.  Participate in a workshop anytime or dip your digital toes into all nine!


Week 3: Icelandic Imagery & Visual Storytelling

RESOURCES:


This week’s digital skills workshop: Telling Stories in Photos

To assist festival-goers in further developing their digital literacy skills and establishing a personal digital identity, each week we highlight a different topic being sponsored by the Bank of DS106 Assignment with volunteer support from the Open DS106 community.  This week we offer “Telling Stories in Photos“.

Rather than specifying “assignments” everyone is encouraged to learn more about the topic, Telling Stories In Photos,  by visiting the Open DS106 Syllabus and choosing something to create from an array of visual based digital projects. Each project links to examples of work completed by others.  They also include links to tutorials that can help you learn how to complete the work. By tagging your web related posts (either on the Burgeron Family blog or a personal blog) with both VisualAssignments and Visual Assignments#### your work will be added to the list of examples.  I found these tips for writing up ds106 Assignments in a blog post most helpful.

The Burgeron family blog is always available for posting. (If you need editor access or help let us know.) Or you can post to your own personal blog. Let us know there’s something new with a tweet tagged with #burgeron106 and posting a quick note at our DS106 Google+ Community.


EXTRA! EXTRA! READ ALL ABOUT IT….

dwarfs-49804_1280Icelandic tales tell of enigmatic elves and other beings – some horrible, some milder. Many folktale motifs of Norwegian folklore may be found too. The somewhat darker tone of Icelandic tales presumably reflects Icelandic ways of life earlier. Folktales illustrate, explain, warn and entertain. Ghosts and fairies pop up to such ends, as do trolls and giants.

As it is, strange tales can instil respect for nature and creatures, or imagined spirits of many sorts. Values can be passed on to children to show them some ways of their ancestors. [Source: http://oaks.nvg.org/icalesin.html]

Image: https://pixabay.com/en/dwarfs-imp-dwarf-garden-gnome-49804/


We invite you to visit any or all of the  Around the World workshops being held this year at the Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival.

FairyPuffin_FestivalPoster

“A fairy tale, or wonder tale, is a kind of folktale or fable. In these stories we meet witches and queens, giants and elves, princes, dragons, talking animals, ogres, princesses, and sometimes even fairies. Marvelous and magical things happen to characters in fairy tales.” [Source]


TOC for the Folk-stories of Iceland: http://www.vsnrweb-publications.org.uk/Text%20Series/Folk-stories.pdf

IcelandicTalesTOC_A IcelandicTalesTOC_B

SuperMoo MOOOONS Over Anna Cow

SuperMoo_AnnaCow_ScotHigh

“Love is in the air”- SuperMoo and AnnaCow atop the Scottish Highlands

SuperMoo caught a glimpse of Ms. Anna Cow while she was preparing for her role as “The Sleeping Beauty” and nothing has been the same since at the #Burgeron106 homestead.  He’s been smitten… to put it mildly.  His dreams are now filled with romantic adventures of whisking her away to far-off exotic places.

AnnyCow_400x400

Anna Cow sans makeup

With this week’s Celtic Fairy Tale theme at the Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival, he found a Scottish Ballad arranged for the Lyre among my files, “My Black-Haired Maid”, that he’s tweaking a wee bit to express his deepest feelings of love and adoration for our fair lady.

“My Black-Spotted Maid” is a work in progress. Sadly, SuperMoo is not musically inclined, but the family has jumped in to help. Cousin Ron was willing to pluck out the notes, which SuperMoo passed along to my grand daughter Rochelle to employ her singing and guitar playing talents.  Why he’s even commissioned the Headless Inkspots to create an orchestral version. I’m looking forward to hearing “The Black-Spotted Maid’s” debut on “The Porch” later in the festival.

Dr.M_TreeHouse_StoryTime

Method Actor Ms. Anna Cow preparing for her role as “The Sleeping Beauty”. (Read More about this image)

My Black-Spotted Maid
(New Lyrics by SuperMoo)

Refrain:
My black-spotted maid, so leal and true,
My darling, do not leave me;
Though black and white, a fairer hue
I would not have, believe me.

Thy cheeks are waxen red and fair.
Thy shining eyes are clearest.
Beneath thy shining silken hair –
My heart is thine, my dearest.
Refrain

Thy large brown eyes, so mild and bright,
Beneath their lashes beaming.
Like lucid dew-drops when the light
Of morn is o-er them streaming.
Refrain

Thy glossy tresses from their snood
In waving fold unbraided.
Thou could’st not have a richer hood,
Or be more neatly shaded.
Refrain

Tis for the love I bear to thee –
A love with sorrow laden –
That thou art banished far from me,
My bonnie black-spotted maiden
Refrain

*Leal: loyal and faithful
*Snood: ornamental hairnet


Attributions:

The Celts Cometh

The Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival is underway. Our weekly Around The World workshops are a place to learn more about a culture and to build your creative digital muscles.  Participate in a workshop anytime or dip your digital toes into all nine!


Week 2: The Celts Cometh & Designing Destiny

Resources:

duncmyth“This anthology of Celtic folklore tales by Joseph Jacobs is one of the best of the crop. It includes some great tales such as “Munachar and Manachar”, the “Brewery of Eggshells”, and “Fair, Brown and Trembling”. Jacobs also includes an extensive Notes and References section if you want to follow up on each tale.”

Scottish:

Scottish“This is a collection of Scottish folklore which will appeal to all ages. There are animal tales, stories of the fairies of Scotland including Brownies, Bogles, Kelpies, Mermaids and others, and tales of Witches and of Giants. While many of the themes are similar to other European folk-tales, this collection emphasizes specifically Scottish aspects of the stories.”

Irish:


This week’s digital skills workshop: It’s All By Design

To assist festival-goers in further developing their digital literacy skills and establishing a personal digital identity, each week we highlight a different topic being sponsored by the Bank of DS106 Assignment with volunteer support from the Open DS106 community.  This week we offer “It’s All By Design”.

Rather than specifying “assignments” everyone is encouraged to learn more about the topic, Design,  by visiting the Open DS106 Syllabus and choosing something to create from an array of digital design projects. Each project links to examples of work completed by others.  They also include links to tutorials that can help you learn how to complete the work. By tagging your web related posts (either on the Burgeron Family blog or a personal blog) with both DesignAssignments and DesignAssignments#### your work will be added to the list of examples.  We found these tips for writing up ds106 Assignments in a blog post most helpful.

The Burgeron family blog is always available for posting. (If you need editor access or help let us know.) Or you can post to your own personal blog. Let us know there’s something new with a tweet tagged with #burgeron106 and posting a quick note at our DS106 Google+ Community.


Extra Extra Read All About It….

Celtic folk-tales, while more numerous, are also the oldest of the tales of modern European races.   They include (1) fairy tales properly so-called–i.e., tales or anecdotes about fairies, hobgoblins, &c., told as natural occurrences; (2) hero-tales, stories of adventure told of national or mythical heroes; (3) folk-tales proper, describing marvellous adventures of otherwise unknown heroes, in which there is a defined plot and supernatural characters (speaking animals, giants, dwarfs, &c.); and finally (4) drolls, comic anecdotes of feats of stupidity or cunning. (reference source)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_nations

 

Happenings in Holland


Week 1: Netherlands Nostalgia & Working The Web

stork-DS106_Dutch2

DUTCH FAIRY TALES

The Around The World workshops at the Annual Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival are in full swing with continued learning, reading, storytelling, writing, creating art, and much more.  We were encouraged to visit Holland this week and try our hand at working with the web.  My research into Dutch fairy tales began a few weeks back when Professor Ryker T. Stork arrived at the Burgeron place.  If you look close at our website banner you can see that he’s taken up residence atop my shed in the large nest that Cousin Ron made for him-  as I learned is common in the stork world through reading Dutch fairy tales like “Why The Stork Loves Holland”.  The “why storks deliver babies” thing was an interesting aside.

Speaking of “aside”, my confusion and curiosity about the whole Netherlands/Holland/Dutch nomenclature had me searching the web trying to wrap my ol’ brain around it. Cousin Ron offered to help me out by pointing me to short video on YouTube that claimed to be able to teach me everything I needed to know to be able to know the difference between Holland & The Netherlands in only 4 minutes.  I’m not sure if it helped or made matters worse. I’m leaning more towards the “worse”. 🙂


WEB ASSIGNMENT: “Email! Email! Read All About It!”

For a Web Assignment I took a trip to the Bank of DS106 Assignments to see what piqued my interest. I decided  WebAssignments1644, “Email! Email! Read All About It!” was something I wanted to invest in. As directed, I opened an account at Vertical Response. It was a painless process that went smoothly, and it’s FREE for small newsletter distributions like what we have here in Bovine County and the Fairy Tale Festival.

The user interface to create the newsletter and e-mail distribution list were straightforward.  There are templates with somewhat limited formatting choices, but that actually made it easier. (I saw an option for using your own HTML code, but I haven’t followed up on that yet.) I could go in and make an adequate newsletter very quickly.  Seeing in-app previews for both laptop and mobile devices was a real bonus. Sending draft copies to myself helped me to fine-tune the layout and links. I always like to test things out on myself before subjecting my friends and family to my projects.

I chose a few posts from our blog that I felt would provide an introduction or update to what we were up to and that a reader would be drawn in by the image. The color selection of the outside margins was an unexpected detail that bothered me for quite awhile until I finally settled on a golden color that went with the banner color scheme. (See image at end of post.)

Once the formatting was finished I could send it to my e-mail list.  There is a fantastic stats page that lets you see who actually opened the e-mail and who clicked on what. I mean, it gives you e-mail address detail, not just aggregated numbers. It then suggests that I resend it the newsletter to the e-mail addresses that didn’t open it the first time.  As you can see below, I had a disappointing 50% hit rate for my first newsletter. 😦

VerticalResponse_Stats

As noted in the assignment directions, there’s no easy way that I could find even, to embed a copy of the newsletter into our blog.  And after much trial and error I found that I could hover over the “View Online” link at the top of the e-mail newsletter, then right-click to “copy address”. I’m hoping this turns out to be a successful workaround to provide a link to the online version of the newsletter. I haven’t tested it on anyone else yet though.  Let me know what happens for you.

http://bit.ly/1UmmJT0

I wanted to have an actual embedded newsletter with active links in my post here. Simply copying the newsletter didn’t work well. I then settled for recreating an image of the newsletter, so at least you could see what I’d created. I pulled up a preview copy of the newsletter, using the Grab app on my iMac I capture the image in three parts. I then opened and combined the layers in Photoshop to produce the image below.

I briefly considered recreating the live links with a recently discovered feature the “Slice Tool” in Photoshop that allows you to create hyperlinks on an image. The effort to add that fine-detail wasn’t worth it this time around.  Maybe with my next project….

Newsletter_1

Number 6 Reads Fairy Tales

Children? Children? Where are the children in The Village? I’m not sure how I feel about finding out there is a nursery in the village.

VIllageNursery

But I was totally delighted when I saw Number 6 reading fairy tales to the little ones on one of the tapes I had procured on a recent visit. As we all  know The Village keeps meticulous records.  There were a total of 17 video tapes in all. They each came with a title and a detailed account of what was on the tape. I was intrigued by the title of tape #16, “Once Upon A Time“, but was disappointed upon finding no fairy tales- only one more desperate dark attempt by Number 2 to extract INFORMATION from Number 6 by using some sort of a regressive therapy technique, directing a series of psychodramas in an “Embryo Room” where they go through the different stages of Number Six’s life hoping to extract why he resigned. Surprise, Surprise…. Number 6 thwarts Number 2’s fiendish efforts and reveals nothing of importance in the end.

Village_StoryBookThen I popped in tape 15, “The Girl Who Was Death“. And there… in the last two minutes of the tape was dear Number 6 reading fairy tales to the village children from the village story book. Although I had easily hacked my way in to watching the videos in Dr. M’s screening room, due to an elaborate encryption of the tapes, I have thus far been unable to download them in a digital version which I can easily share with the rest of the family.  But you know that’s not going to stop this ol’ lady.  My creative problem solving skills kicked into high gear and I used my iPhone to record the scene playing on the TV. Then I used the Photo Transfer App to transfer the video to my iMac where I could more easily work with it- like capturing a frame that showed an image of the village story book.

Using the Grab tool my first attempt at capturing the image resulted in the player bar being visible. Not good.

VillageStoryBook

I tried again, this time capturing a larger section of the screen around the video player window. Much better… Showing my “prisoner” folder under the video player image was an accident that I really loved! It tells more of my process story by seeing how I’m working. (Ya’ gotta love that serendipity thing.)PrisonerVillageStoryBook

Next I used iSkysoft iMedia Converter Deluxe to convert the slightly less versatile older .mov format to .mp4 so I could post it to YouTube and people who still used those buggy PC’s (as opposed to a wonderful iMac like mine) could watch it without problems. I realized after it was too late that I had forgotten to trim the end that showed the credits. I didn’t want those. Yippee! I didn’t have to delete the already uploaded video, I could use the “enhancements” option on YouTube to split and trim my video right there in place. No need to upload anything new.

See for yourself how wonderful Number Six is with the village children.  He’s promised to come back tomorrow night to read them another. Perhaps Cousin Ron can sneak him a copy of “The Little Butterfly and the Old House“. Or one of the Burgeron family can locate The Village Story Book and bring it back to the Bovine County Fairy Tale festival. What other stories might be in there?

#Burgeron106 Infiltrates #Prisoner106

The big news this week hasn’t been the official opening of the Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival as anticipated.  Although the first workshop, “Holland Works The Web” was announced.  And there’s an active project underway to record a version of “Goldilocks and The Three Bears.”

 

What’s really captured the attention and imaginations of the family at the Burgeron place has been the new transporter retrofit at Dr. M’s tree house. What innocently began as “gawker” trips to The Prisoner106 Village have become more and more frequent and some members of the family have succumbed to the sweet siren’s call of #Prisoner106. They’ve handed in their resignation and received their official village ID cards in order to partake of the full amenities available to the compliant residents of The Village.

 

Cousin Ron => https://plus.google.com/104078047498793487097/posts/cF9UQGHTmXb

Aunt Sappy => https://plus.google.com/112076250988242598096/posts/YpuRBXJv9Zw

Bernie Burgeron posts =>https://plus.google.com/+KathyOnarheim/posts/X7hewccQbyr

 

 

 

Upon seeing this alarming development I made a plan to infiltrate The Prisoner106 Village to keep my Burgeron106 family safe and help them escape should that prove necessary. Becoming a resident of The Prisoner106 Village retirement home was an obvious fit.  With the added benefit that I could feign sudden on-set dementia and Alzheimers if I got caught and they pressed me for information.

To get my credentials I was able to forge a fake village resident card by hacking into the the Village Office computer, downloading their layered PSD file and creating my own card. It was an easy hack.  Minor issues I had to deal with were downloading the official village font (Village.ttf available at dafont.com  or Village.ttf available at theprisoneronline.com)  and deciding what my village role would be: explosives expert (read more…) and Biomedical Engineer so I’d have easy access to the hospital.

My quote was trickier. I wasn’t familiar with “The Prisoner” and hadn’t started watching the secret tapes yet that I’d found. So I pulled up Wikipedia to peruse popular Prisoner quotes until I found one that I liked.

“Oh certainly, but both sides are becoming identical. What in fact has been created is an international community–perfect blueprint for world order. When the sides facing each other suddenly realize that they’re looking into a mirror, they will see that “this” is the pattern for the future.”

Another troubling development is what appears to be a glitch with Dr. M’s transporter technology. I’m quite alarmed.  A little background research on her  transporter technology developers should raise eyebrows as to their technical mastery. I’m questioning whether these guys have even a minimal understanding of Einsteins Theory of Relativity.

It turns out that when she uses the treehouse transporter time stops in Bovine County until she returns.

How is this going to impact our Fairy Tale Festival?  If time stops here in Bovine County while our family is away, when they return will it be as if nothing unusual had happened and we simply pick right back up where things left off?

Am I the only one who realizes this time stopping phenonmemon is occurring? Will it be okay to let the family run their course with the #Prisoner106 village until they have reached their fill?

Holland Works The Web

The Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival is underway. Our weekly Around The World workshops are a place to learn more about a culture and to build your creative digital muscles.  Participate in a workshop anytime or dip your digital toe into all nine!


Week 1: Netherlands Nostalgia & Working The Web

stork-DS106_Dutch2My heart nearly gave out a few weeks back as a stork flew in, out-of-the-blue. I thought he was delivering a baby for ol’ Nanalou.  But no… nothing like that.  It was Professor Ryker Teunis Stork, world renowned scholar of Dutch Fairy Tales and Proverbs from the University of Amsterdam. On the invitation of Cousin Ron he had flown in to spend his sabbatical teaching Dutch Folklore workshops at our Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival.  After meeting Professor Ryker I was so excited to learn more about the Dutch culture that I jumped right into losing myself in the Google, entering new search terms and following link after link.

Here are a few the family might be interested in.


This week’s digital skills workshop: Working The Web

To assist festival-goers in further developing their digital literacy skills and establishing a personal digital identity, each week we highlight a different topic being sponsored by the Bank of DS106 Assignment with volunteer support from the Open DS106 community.  This week we offer Working the Web.

Rather than specifying “assignments” everyone is encouraged to learn more about the topic, Telling Stories Within the Web,  by visiting the Open DS106 Syllabus and choosing something to create from an array of web based digital projects. Each project links to examples of work completed by others.  They also include links to tutorials that can help you learn how to complete the work. By tagging your web related posts (either on the Burgeron Family blog or a personal blog) with both WebAssignments and WebAssignments#### your work will be added to the list of examples.  I found these tips for writing up ds106 Assignments in a blog post most helpful.

The Burgeron family blog is always available for posting. (If you need editor access or help let us know.) Or you can post to your own personal blog. Let us know there’s something new with a tweet tagged with #burgeron106 and posting a quick note at our DS106 Google+ Community.


EXTRA! EXTRA! READ ALL ABOUT IT…

Did you know due to the maritime and economic power of this area of provinces in the 17th century, the Netherlands became known worldwide as Holland. To make matters even more confusing the inhabitants of the Netherlands are called Dutch and their country, the former County of Holland, roughly consists of the two Dutch provinces of North Holland and South Holland.  You can learn more about the Netherlands with a visit yourself to Wikipedia. I’d also recommend checking out the World Atlas for a quick history lesson.

Map_Europe_Netherlands Map_Netherlands

And if you’re lazy … watch this short video which will explain all to you about the Kingdom of The Netherlands in 4 minutes.

Or this one:


We invite you to visit any or all of the  Around the World workshops being held this summer at the #Burgeron106 Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival.

FairyPuffin_FestivalPoster

Burgeron Babes In Fairy Tale Land

The Burgeron children have been playing and preparing for the Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival.  Some more patiently than others.  Our evening story time has been a big draw for the little ones, not to mention all of the reading going on at quiet-time every afternoon.  I’ve got a whole book shelf of old illustrated fairy tales left to me by my grandmother that the kids can borrow.


OldFairyTales


 

3BearsText

My 4 year-old great-great grandson DJ and I have been reading from the fully illustrated, “The Old, Old Fairy Tales“, a collection of classic fairy tales published in 1890ish by Mrs. Valentine. One of his favorites is, “The Three Bears”. Sometimes Mama Boo and Aunt Sappy join us to do the voices for each of the bears and little “Golden Hair”.  Aunt Sappy, to the delight of all of the children, has also been sharing fairy tales she’s writing herself-  most recently of “The Lady of Stavoren.”

You might enjoy checking out some of the on-line fairy tale collections that the older kids have found and recommend festival goers have a looksie.

Meet The Italian Fairy Godfather

The official opening of the Fairy Tales Around The World workshops is next week. And this Burgeron family matriarch is looking forward to following in the footsteps of the Italian Fairy Godfather by collecting the tales and art created at this year’s Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival. By the end of the summer we plan on having enough material to publish an official multi-media flipbook to share with the rest of the world. But until then you can read one of the earliest (1550) and most valuable collections of fairy tales in history and find out for yourself why in 1624 it was placed on the Index of Prohibited Books.

straparola-the-italian-fairy-tale-collector-and-fairy-godfather-cover

The first book of Fairy Tales were said to have been collected by Giovanni Straparola in 1550.

Set aside Charles Perrault and The Brothers Grimm, are you familiar with the name Straparola? Giovanni Francesco Straparola?  No? Well, this man collected and created one of the earliest and most valuable collections of fairy tales in history, setting the standard for many of today’s much loved fairy tales, and earning him the accolade of Fairy Godfather. What makes Straparola’s collection, The Facetious Nights of Straparola, one of the most important to exist is that it is perhaps the first use of popular folklore as a basis for fictional literature.

The Facetious Nights of Straparola was first published in Italy between 1550-55  where Straparola uses a frame narrative of participants at a 13-day party on an island near Venice telling stories to one another that vary from bawdy to fantastic. Songs and dances begin each night, and the nights end with a riddle or enigma. The 75 tales include folk and fairy-tales (about 15); Boccaccio-like novellas with themes of trickery and intrigue; and tragic and heroic stories.  Many of the tales were later collected or retold in Giambattista Basile’s The Tale of Tales (1634–36) and Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Grimm’s Fairy Tales (1812–15).[1]

In 1894 the tales were translated into English for the first time by W.G. Waters. Click on the books below to read and find out for yourself why the Fairy Godfather, Giovanni Straparola (aka the “Babbler” ), was  placed on the book blacklist.

The Nights of Straparola – Volume 1

The Nights of Straparola – Volume 2 

Ryker Teunis Stork Arrives

The Burgeron place has been all aflutter this week preparing for the Bovine County Fairy Tale Festival. Talk about a flutter…  My heart nearly gave out as a stork flew in this week, out-of-the-blue. I almost fainted right then and there thinkin’ he was delivering a baby for ol’ Nanalou. I’m far too old for that kind of thing. But no… nothing like that.  It was Professor Ryker Teunis Stork, world renowned scholar of Dutch Fairy Tales and Proverbs from the University of Amsterdam. On the invitation of Cousin Ron he had flown in to spend his sabbatical in Bovine County to teach Dutch Folklore workshops.

Cousin Ron has an RV parked behind my shed and is making the place something magical.  You just have to see it to believe it.  Festival goers are invited  to join him on a magical journey into the world of Dutch Fairy Tales. To bring an aire of authenticity to the “Dutch Zone” Ron placed an old cart wheel on the top of my roof- a long tradition in Holland to encourage the Stork to take up residence.  He didn’t tell me about it though. And you can imagine the fright I had when I saw this White Stork flying in and landing right there on the top of my shed, and immediately begin calling out to Ron with all those clicks letting him know he’d arrived.

stork-roof_GIF_short

After the two of them calmed me down and reassured me I wasn’t in a “family way” they sat out on my front porch to reminisce their exploits as young dutch”men” growing up in the Netherlands.  The proverbs! The proverbs! I had no idea how many of those pithy little sayings like:

“Aan de vruchten kent men den boom” – The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

or

“Het end is goed, alles is goed.” – All is well that ends well.

originated in Holland.

Ryker has been so thoughtful. To show his appreciation for letting him stay on my roof for the summer, he presented me with a painting1130px-Pieter_Bruegel_the_Elder_-_The_Dutch_Proverbs_-_Google_Art_Project Netherlandish Proverbs (Dutch: Nederlandse Spreekwoorden) by the 16th century Flemish artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder that depicts a scene in which humans and, to a lesser extent, animals and objects, offer literal illustrations of Dutch language proverbs and idioms.

I’m very excited to learn more about the Dutch culture this summer.  Once Professor Ryker and Ron retired for the night, I jumped right into loosing myself with Google as I entered new search terms and followed link after link. Here are a few the family might be interested in.

There have been a few more inquires to reserve space at the festival, but nothing definite. There was one initial inquiry about a Middle Earth shire, but no commitments yet.

The spots should be filling soon.


Image Credits: